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20130714
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of environment for the investment is also one of our national priorities. currently, the climate for investment according to international ratings isn't among the top 20, i would say, but i wish we have a chance to get in the same kind of format in five years. i bet we will be in the 20. we are working hard on creating conditions in russia that would be considered by other outside investors as good as in 20 best countries in the world. but even today i think our investment climate is very much underrated, and we are doing much better than some of late. at the same time, also when it comes to russian economy we have enjoyed previous -- [inaudible] fiscal environment. we have accumulated significant reserves. we have two funds, one sovereign fund which is about 40 -- $84 billion and another reserve fund that is another $80-miss -- $80-plus billion. and the national reserves are 500 plus billion dollars as well. we are almost debt-free country because our external debt is no more than 2.5% and including internal debt is around 10, 11%. if you compare it with the g8 countries and with the country t
security and not absolute security. it is a proportional metrics. the more security environment, the more substantial the project you can pursue. >> to follow up on that, in iraq , the assessments being done about security and engagement, in the aftermath, those assessments were being done by our ambassador and those assessments were being done by the generals on the ground. where are they on this proposal. do they feel that they would generals or massacres feel that they would have benefited i having this? thehe generals or ambassadors feel that they would have benefited i having this? >> he supports the idea of having it. >> when the u.s. is operating ambassador in iraq and with the u.s. operates elsewhere, it is ambassador who heads the effort in the country. the commanding general heads the defense operations. understand what was said. this would it fit in command? >> the mission is discrete and will to find. clarity will provide certainty to both agencies and the contractors. it would be somewhat like fema. its mission is to oversee the relief or reconstruction at 230 -- activity in
environment? i would urge my colleagues to join the bipartisan and growing list of members who've co-sponsored the personalize your care act, h.r. 1173. someday congress will deal with the vast looming crisis we face. in the meantime, helping patients understand their choices, make their wishes known and respected is an important step to start. thank you very much. . thank you very much. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. barletta, for five minutes. mr. barletta: i rise today in the wake of the passage of the senate amnesty bill to shed light on two important elements of illegal immigration that the senate grossly overlooked. as we know the senate bill pa pairs border security with amnesty. this makes no sense. you would never replace your carpet at home if you still had a hole in the roof. i'm hopeful that the house will put border security first, but i still have concerns. that's why today i'm introducing two pieces of legislation, one will address the problem of visa overstays. and the other will ask for a
. the less secure the environment, the smaller the project for the more security in barbur, the more substantial the project you can pursue. >> in iraq, you have the assessments being done about security and about engagement. in the absence of usoco, those assessments were being done by our ambassador and those assessments were being done by the generals on the ground. where are they on this proposal? do they feel that would have benefited? to any of the generals or ambassadors who served in iraq feel that they would have benefited by having best? >> yes, sir. ambassador crocker says this would have enabled him to operate more effectively and he supports the idea of creating usoco. operatinge u.s. is overseas -- i guess we can broaden this to syria -- the ambassador in iraq and when the u.s. operates elsewhere, it is the ambassador who heads the civilian efforts in the country. the commanding general then heads the defense operations. ambassadord what crocker said. thee would usoco fit into chain of command? is it on par with state and dot? >> the mission would be discreet and well-d
: the colorado department of public health and environment is in charge of making sure the panels in the thousands of gallons of contaminated liquids in warehouses and manufacturing plants are disposed of properly. >> so those facilities are big. there's a lot of machinery left behind. that machinery needs to be decontaminated so that there is no cadmium left on that material. and that would be expensive. >> reporter: they say no state or federal cleanup dollars will be used. the tab, reported to be at $2.2 million job, belongs to abound. and if what's left of the company's resources don't cover it, property owners will be stuck with costs, as reusable inventory goes to other solar manufacturers. >> i think what you'll see is many of the materials that were left behind will end up in a recycling stream. >> reporter: the solar energy industry's association says despite the dangerous mess, solar is still the cleanest and most abundant form of energy today. >> it's unfortunate that they are bankrupt and out of business. but the technology that they relied upon, american innovation an
the internal mcleary environment in russia. as i said at the outset i agree with you as well that wherever we can as we try to do we have to try to work with russian our common interests and we have had success in that regard particularly on foreign-policy issues that we share. with regard to our support for democratic change and reform for those speaking out for a pluralistic society we have to despise the environment continue to work with the russians who are willing to work with us. we are not able to support them as fully and we still need to make support available in other ways and i will if confirmed he eager to work with all of you on the committee to look for more ways to do that. in addition we have to speak out as you said and as i said in my opening when we disagree and we have to work more intensively and more cohesively with our european allies and partners because when we speak together our concerns are even stronger. see let me ask you one question about the trade agreement. how worried are you about the ability of europe to be on -- we have seen over the past week france seems
the presence of 14 different theaters of operations. some of these operational environments are less amenable than others, others have become sites of revival and resuscitation, such as iraq and west africa. al qaeda has been able to achieve the unthinkable. radicalizing persons who are citizens of the united states and canada and inspiring and motivating them to engage in terrorist acts, whether on their own or at the direction of senior leadership. the continuing challenge the united states will face is that al qaeda's court ideology remains attractive to a hard- core radical and is capable of drawing into its ranks. the latest recruits to the struggle are the tsarnaev brothers. the violence inflicted on muslims in general has been cited by many homegrown terrorists as the salient motivating factor in their politicization. this may also explain why the american invasions of iraq and afghanistan were cited as the reasons behind the bombing at the boston marathon. there is no one path to radicalization. individuals will always be attracted to violence in different ways. they come from every w
route, questions about safety and design of the site and its impact on the surrounding environment and populations have never, never been saturday torle addressed. t, while cutting the vital competitiveness, stripping investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy development, this legislation mandates that millions be squandered in an effort to restart a boondoggle that has been doomed from the start. now why are we throwing good money after bad ideas? we should not be turning back the clock. we should be moving forward. i would say to my colleagues, please support this amendment. it will eliminate economic waste and allow congress to have a proper discussion about how to dispose of the nation's nuclear waste. i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? >> to strike the last word. bart bart i want to rise in support of chairman frelinghuysen's opposition to the heck amendment. we've heard quite a bit of rhetoric on the floor the last 10 minutes about yucca mountain and i understand my colleagues rom colleagues f
both for the environment, the atmosphere, the communities living near the mountain top removal where they blow up entire mountains in west virginia and through appalachia. but we're seeing this trade-off of one form of pollution for another. one form of dirty energy for another. a lot of that has to do with the influence of the natural gas industry has on this administration. what we're asking the president to do is to please sit down and meet with the families in the film "gasland 2" that are emblematic of several families in the united states that are suffering at the hands of drilling in united states history domestically and to meet with the scientists and engineers featured in the film who explain the dark side of fracking. water contamination that is an inevitability that's happening all across the shale gas areas because the wells crack and leak and the industry knows they crack and leak and because of the issue brought up of methane being this super greenhouse gas that is being emitted all over the production. in the production fields, in the gas fields in the transmission li
environment would this set up and would it be really easy to try and just turn one of your own employees in, co-workers in? >> yeah. well, let me say this, because i believe that classified information should stay classified and there used to be a tradition and habit and mandate across the federal government that it was treated as such. so any attempts to make sure that secret information from the government remains secret is something that should be unobjectionable. but of course, in this current environment, what you have i suppose is a training program for snitches, or a training program so that you've got these experienced spies who can spy on the rest of us. i don't know. >> steve: it's crazy. let's take folks down to gitmo where a bunch of those guys who are being held are on a continued hunger strike. a judge ruled monday that she lacked the authority to halt the forced feeding. you refer to this essentially as jihad theater or sircdu jihad, certainly. i think you have to put this latest round of hunger strikes, which have been going on for several months in context, and the fact is
of history. from early days, surge days, to drawdown days, to the current environment where we are actually watching from the completion of projects that were begun long ago, but also watching the strategic effects of u.s. engagement and disengagement. a very special position to be able to look at these things because the watchdog that ensures that u.s. tax dollars that are spent inside iraq are spent well and wisely. but it's also a wonderful for evaluating our changing mission and changing program in iraq precisely because as a public watchdog, as someone who looks at military projects from a civilian perspective, we -- he has the opportunity to talk about very many different problems, challenges and lessons learned that he's been able to work on over the past nine years. he's also the author, along with his team of learning from iraq, a book that i commend to you for reading, and for learning. and so with that introduction, please help me welcome stuart bowen. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, kim. thanks to the institute and to all of you for being here this morning. it's a privilege
by the army or the police or by the citizenry. don't wish to see a dupoly environment held by the state. there's no way to make a gun safe. host: what about the regulations? you talked about a serial number on every gun. you write about it in the story. tell our viewers. question aboute what happens if a gun comes out bad. , if it is beyond repair within the factory. the answer is that this is a heavily regulated area. the receiver which is the part of the gun that makes it a gun, it does the firing, it told the round and contains the trigger housing. every single one of those made has to have a serial number. even if it comes out broken. if it comes out broken, that have to take a picture of cutting it in half and then send that to the federal government if the federal government asks for it. they have to document it. it is not as if there are people popping in at night and stealing chocolate. this is already regulated industry. norfolk, va., independent college. about: you were talking having guns designed to kill people and animals. do they talk about the number of people who have been kill
away from the conversation is a different media environment than today. guest: very true. were threeys, there television networks. they controlled 95% of the audience we did not have cable tv. we did not have the internet. it worked both ways. richard nixon was one of the last american presidents who could use the bully pulpit in ways that moved in numbers. the white house could calle threonine in new york city at 1:00 and be assured of having -- 3 man in new york city at 1:00 in the morning and be assured of having primetime that night. verax of wrightwood offer was called instant analysis. today the president wants to make a speech. he may not be on three networks. and does not particularly a matter. he will be on cable. cable is defined by their own ideological color races. forget. seeral ride -- eric vereid. before he is halfway through his speech, millions are twittering their analysis. it is a different environment. it was the mistress of the chief job of the president is to persuade people. it is a lot harder to persuade people today than it was in richard nixon's time. nixons o
and methane into the environment than if we hadn't done these regulations. gregg: and higher costs for consumersesome. >> no doubt about that. the biggest concern is not so much prices, but they will be affected, it's jobs. a lot of people in the coal mining industry, a lot of people in the manufacturing sector, and these are union jobs, by the way, gregg. very worried about what's going to happen to their job if we increase the prices and put, you know, one of the effects of this will be, essentially, to put coal mining out of business. gregg: all right. stephen moore, as always, thank you very much. >> thank you, gregg. gregg: in the meantime, new numbers showing president obama's approval rating has taken a serious dive since his re-election. coming up, we're going to speak with brit hume about what's really behind this decline. >>> plus, the defense in the george zimmerman trial getting its first full day right now on the witness stand a former coworker of zimmerman. the trial is streaming in full on foxnews.com. out there owning it. the ones getting involved and staying engage
-- inhospitable environment. as dr. neeson laid out in his report, the radical regime of iran is a long-standing highly developed structure in latin america. the primary purpose is to spread the iranian revolution by any means necessary, including terrorist attacks. decision by the bombings as mentioned earlier, and three publicly known failed attacks in the night states. this includes the 2007 attempt , and theas pipe lines 2000 on plot to hire hitman limits can -- from a mexican cartel. it is important that all three offers for all the rest the highest levels of the reigning government. these are manifestations of the core belief of every iranian government since the revolution. review fromst october 22, 1987, the cia stated that iranian leaders view terrorism as an important tool government. the use terrorism selectively and skillfully in coordination with diplomacy and military tactics. we believe leaders leave that terrorism is an except of a policy option, although they may differ on the appropriateness of the particular act of terrorism. reality inundamental the iranian constitut
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)